Otom Sushiya (partial)

I’ve been meaning to do a write-up on Otom Sushi-ya for a while, but I kept forgetting to bring my camera. So today, when I finally did bring my camera, I was too busy eating to remember to take it out until it was almost the end of my meal. Thus, a short summary of the last couple of dishes I had for lunch.

Otom Sushiya

Shige, the itamae (sushi-chef) had cut up a live amaebi and put it in the oven a few minutes before and out came this delicious looking cooked shrimp. I’ve never had cooked amaebi before since I usually eat it raw, but this tasted just like tender lobster! It was hard to eat out of the shell, but definitely worth it.
Otom Sushiya

Next, I was served salmon tartare, which I’ve never had before. It was rich, creamy, and melted in my mouth. The shiso leaf that accompanied it helped cut down on the fattiness of the salmon. Next to it was a tempura-battered large pepper, much like a gigantic shishito pepper. Shige said he had gotten it from his friend’s farm in New Mexico. Stuffed with spicy tuna and deep fried, it was deliciously decadent.
Otom Sushiya

I was curious what the last dish was going to be, but as soon as I saw the torch come out, I knew it would be something I liked. Who doesn’t like food cooked with a mini blow-torch?
Otom Sushiya

Kobe-styled beef nigiri finished off the meal. Shige put a few drops of a balsamic vinegar that called ‘Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale di Modena’ on the label, and it lent a bit of sweetness to the tender meat. Maybe I was spoiled by the wonderful texture of the fish I had before, but the combination of beef and sushi rice was a strange one. It was tasty, but still caught me off-guard. I felt like I was eating the world’s smallest beef terriyaki bowl.

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